Peaches and Cream Pavlova

This simple, healthy dessert is a perfect summertime treat. The crust is made from oats and flour, then filled with whipped cream for the most decadent of treats!

A “peach pavlova” is a dessert that consists of meringue and whipped cream. The peach flavor comes from the addition of peaches, while the creaminess comes from using vanilla bean or almond extract.

Peaches and cream pavlova, also known as an unbelievably light, melt-in-your-mouth pavlova topped with freshly whipped cream and luscious peach slices, is your new favorite peach dessert.

Pavlova with Peaches and Cream

She’s a light person. She’s the epitome of sweetness. She’s a crowd-pleasing performer. And, not that appearances matter, but she’s also quite cute.

One of the most underappreciated culinary pairings of all time is peaches and cream. Is it just me, or is the fact that oranges and cream are a more popular taste perplexing? I understand–creamsicles are delicious, but a peaches and cream creamsicle would be even better. The juicy, tangy and sweet peachy taste is wonderfully balanced by the light, creamy whipped cream.

We simply had to prepare a handmade pavlova topped with freshly whipped cream and peach slices and name it peaches and cream pavlova since the grocery store was filled with luscious peaches. Have you heard of anything more entertaining and delectable?!

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Pavlova with Peaches and Cream Ingredients

While this peaches and cram pavlova may seem to be complicated, it’s really rather simple to make. You’ll also need a few items, which you most likely already have in your fridge or cabinet.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Stiffly beaten egg whites, like any meringue, will produce the light and airy framework of your pavlova.
  • Granulated Sugar: Sugar will not only sweeten the egg whites, but it will also aerate them and give them a lovely crisp exterior. However, a gritty pavlova is the last thing you want, so make sure you beat the batter long enough to remove any granules.
  • Vanilla Extract: To take a delicious dessert to the next level, it requires a decent vanilla extract.
  • Cream of Tartar: Cream of tartar aids in the stabilization of egg whites.
  • Heavy Cream: Of course, a peaches and cream pavlova would be incomplete without some heavy cream! The secret is to use heavy cream or heavy whipping cream1.
  • Powdered Sugar: A pinch of powdered sugar can help your homemade whipped cream thicken and sweeten.
  • Fresh Peaches: Your pillowy soft, marshmallowy meringue and fresh whipped cream will pair well with fresh juicy peaches.
  • Peach Preserves: This is optional, but I adore a pavlova that is gently drippy and juicy. To give this peach pavlova an additional peachy punch, we drizzled it with peach preserves (we adore Bonne Maman).

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What is the best way to make a pavlova?

I suggest using a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or a silpat to bake your cake. Meringues should not be made on a greased surface since the egg whites need a little something to grasp to in order to keep their shape. I suggest tracing the size and form of the pavlova you desire. You may create a large pavlova by tracing an 8-inch cake pan, or make 6 to 8 little pavlovas if preferred. Tracing the form will provide you with some sizing recommendations, but feel free to play about with it. When you’ve molded the batter into a circle, create a divot in the middle (like a very shallow volcano) so you have a shallow hole to fill with freshly whipped cream and peaches in season.

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What causes pavlova to crack?

With a meringue this large, cracking is unavoidable, so don’t get too worked up over it. Unfortunately, air bubbles, rapid temperature swings, and oven idiosyncrasies may all cause cracking. However, there are a few things we’ve discovered to be beneficial in preventing cracking:

  1. Before baking, make sure the sugar is thoroughly dissolved in the pavlova. Sugar granules not only produce a grittier pavlova, but they may also cause air bubbles to develop, resulting in fractures.
  2. Know how to use your oven. If there’s one thing I wish more people knew about ovens, it’s that they’re really finicky and vary a lot. Adjust the temperature appropriately if you know your oven runs hot or cool. The pavlova will expand and fracture if the temperature is too high.
  3. Bake the pavlova at 200°F instead of 250°F if your oven has a fan to spread the heat. Turn off the fan if at all feasible to avoid any uneven heating or disruption.
  4. While the pavlova is baking, try not to open the oven. I know it’s been a long time since you didn’t take a look, but temperature variations create cracks, so it’s best to leave it alone.

That is to say, don’t weep over a shattered pavlova. It’ll crack the moment you cut into it anyhow, and it’ll be just as delicious and lovely with a few cracks!

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Friends, enjoy your peaches and cream pavlovas!

XXX

Print

Peaches and cream pavlova, also known as an unbelievably light, melt-in-your-mouth pavlova topped with freshly whipped cream and luscious peach slices, is your new favorite peach dessert.

  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • 15-minute prep time
  • 1 hour to prepare
  • Time required: 3 hours
  • 16 servings 1 time
  • Dessert is a category of food.
  • Oven method
  • Australian cuisine
  • Gluten-free diet
  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • 15-minute prep time
  • 1 hour to prepare
  • Time required: 3 hours
  • 16 servings 1 time
  • Dessert is a category of food.
  • Oven method
  • Australian cuisine
  • Gluten-free diet

Scale:

1x2x3x

  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • 15-minute prep time
  • 1 hour to prepare
  • Time required: 3 hours
  • 16 servings 1 time
  • Dessert is a category of food.
  • Oven method
  • Australian cuisine
  • Gluten-free diet

Ingredients

  • 6 room temperature egg whites
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar (granulated)
  • vanilla extract (two tablespoons)
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons tartaric acid

for the garnish

  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream (whipped)
  • a quarter cup of confectioner’s sugar
  • 2 finely sliced ripe peaches
  • a quarter cup of peach preserves

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 250°F and place the rack in the lowest position.
  2. On parchment paper, trace the shape of an 8-inch cake pan with a pencil. Place the paper on a baking sheet and flip it over. Remove from the equation.
  3. Beat the egg whites on low speed in a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until frothy and tiny bubbles emerge. Continue whisking until the egg whites form soft peaks, gradually increasing the speed to medium. Begin to gently beat in the granulated sugar, salt, and cream of tartar in little additions (I mean this–do not just dump the sugar in a few editions!) until stiff peaks form and the sugar is nearly entirely dissolved.
  4. Add the vanilla essence to the mixture. For 4-5 minutes, beat on high speed until the meringue is firm, glossy, and free of sugar particles.
  5. Spoon the meringue onto the parchment paper and shape it into a tall disk with a cake scraper inside the 8-inch circle you previously defined with the cake pan. Create a little indentation in the middle of the meringue with the cake scraper, similar to the center of a volcano. Finally, form the sides with the scraper or a big spoon into the desired pattern.
  6. Bake for 1 hour, then turn off the heat, crack the oven door to keep it ajar, and leave the pavlova in the oven for an extra hour. The pavlova will fully dry out in the oven while it is baking. Remove from oven after an hour and cool thoroughly on a wire rack.
  7. Make the topping while the pavlova is cooling. Whip the heavy cream and powdered sugar sugar until soft peaks form in a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment. Cover the pavlova with whipped cream.
  8. Place thinly sliced peaches on top of the whipped cream. If using peach preserves, reheat for 30 seconds in the microwave before sprinkling over the pavlova.
  9. Devour!

Keywords: peach pavlova, peach dessert

 

Watch This Video-

The “peach meringue cake” is a classic dessert that has been made for centuries. The dessert consists of whipped cream, sugar, and peaches.

Frequently Asked Questions

How long before serving Can I put cream on a pavlova?

A: This is dependent on the size of your pavlova as well as how thick you have mixed the cream. You should allow at least 20 minutes for it to set and 10 minutes before serving.

What is the difference between a meringue and a pavlova?

A: A meringue is a fluffy dessert made with egg whites and sugar, while a pavlova is an Australian dish consisting of whipped cream and crushed fruit.

Why do you put vinegar in pavlova?

A: This is a pastry with meringue, whipped cream and fruit in it. The acidic vinegar helps the egg whites whip up to form stiffer peaks that hold their shape better when baking.

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