Estonian kringle

This sweet bread is a part of Estonian culture and history, dating back to the 17th century. It’s made from flour, yeast, eggs, butter or margarine and sugar. The dough is folded into logs then twisted like a corkscrew before it’s placed in an oiled pan where cinnamon rolls inside the kringle for about 20 minutes on each side.

The “estonian kringle history” is a traditional pastry that is popular in Estonia. It was introduced to the country by Danish immigrants. The pastry consists of a yeast dough and butter, which is then rolled into thin layers and baked.

What a lovely Estonian Kringle this is! So lovely. Now it’s time to think about logistics. Here’s how it works. This dough was made using the original recipe from Just Love Cookin, however I found it to be somewhat thick and not as soft as I want. So, I’ve included the original recipe at the bottom of the page, but I’ve also included my favorite pull-apart loaf recipe since it’s so much lighter and airier. If you want a softer bread like I do, use the recipe below; if you prefer a denser loaf that doesn’t rise as much but still tastes like bread, use the original recipe from Just Love Cookin.

1636280246_514_Estonian-kringle

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  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • Time to Prepare: 20 minutes
  • Time to prepare: 20 minutes
  • 40-minute total time
  • 1 big loaf (1x) yield
  • Bread is a category of food.
  • Baked method
  • estonian cuisine
  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • Time to Prepare: 20 minutes
  • Time to prepare: 20 minutes
  • 40-minute total time
  • 1 big loaf (1x) yield
  • Bread is a category of food.
  • Baked method
  • estonian cuisine

Scale:

1x2x3x

  • Sofi is the author of this piece.
  • Time to Prepare: 20 minutes
  • Time to prepare: 20 minutes
  • 40-minute total time
  • 1 big loaf (1x) yield
  • Bread is a category of food.
  • Baked method
  • estonian cuisine

Ingredients

to make the dough

  • 2 3/4 cup all-purpose flour plus 2 teaspoons
  • a quarter cup of granulated sugar
  • 1 envelope active dry yeast (2 1/4 tablespoons)
  • a half teaspoon of salt
  • 2 oz. butter (unsalted)
  • 1/3 gallon of whole milk
  • 1 cup of water
  • 2 big room-temperature eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract (pure)

in order to fill

  • 1 cup sugar (granulated)
  • 2 tablespoons cinnamon powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly ground
  • 2 oz. unsalted butter, melted till golden brown

Instructions

  1. 2 cups flour, sugar, yeast, and salt are whisked together in a large mixing basin. Remove from the equation.
  2. Set aside the eggs that have been whisked together.
  3. Melt the butter and milk together in a small saucepan until the butter is just melted. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla essence and water. Allow it sit for a minute or two, or until the temperature reaches 115 to 125°F.
  4. With a spatula, fold the milk mixture into the dry ingredients. Stir in the eggs until they are completely absorbed into the batter. The eggs will be soupy, and it will seem that the dough and eggs will never come together. Continue to stir. Stir in the remaining 3/4 cup flour for approximately 2 minutes with the spatula. It will be a sticky mixture. That’s exactly what I was looking for.
  5. In a large, oiled basin, place the dough. Wrap the dish with plastic wrap and a clean kitchen towel to keep it warm. Allow it rest in a warm place for 1 hour or until it has doubled in size. The dough may be doubled in size and then refrigerated overnight to be used the next day. If you’re going to use this method, just set the dough out on the counter for 30 minutes before rolling it out.
  6. While the dough rises, make the filling by whisking together the sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Remove from the equation.
  7. 2 ounces butter, melted and browned Remove from the equation.
  8. Place a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350°F at this stage.
  9. Remove the rising dough from the bowl and knead in approximately 2 tablespoons of flour. Allow to rest for 5 minutes after covering with a clean kitchen towel. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin on a lightly floured work surface. The dough should be approximately 20 inches long and 12 inches tall. It’s OK if you can’t get the dough to 20 inches long. Simply roll it out as big as the dough will allow. Spread melted butter all over the dough using a pastry brush. All of the sugar and cinnamon mixture should be sprinkled on top. It may seem like there is a lot of sugar in this recipe. Seriously? Simply go for it.
  10. Make a log out of the dough that is 20 inches long. Cut the log in half lengthwise using a big knife. Braid the two halves together, leaving the inner dough layers exposed and the thickest outer layer facing the pan (for more information, check the Just Love Cookin picture post at the bottom of this recipe).
  11. Place the braid on a baking sheet in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown on top. Even if the top is gently browned, the core might still be uncooked. The middle will be cooked as well if the outside is a good, dark, golden brown.
  12. Allow to cool for 20 to 30 minutes after removing from the oven. To loosen the bread, run a butter knife over the braid’s edges. Serve on a dish or platter while still heated.

Just Love Cookin’s original recipe This is a Joy the Baker recipe.

Intricate, opulent, and delectable are some of the adjectives that come to mind when

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The “kringle bread” is a traditional Estonian pastry. It’s made with yeast dough that is rolled into a long, thin tube and then twisted into a spiral. The dough is topped with raisins and sprinkled with sugar before it’s baked in the oven.

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